Header Ads

Point of View: Call For Social Justice To Black Men and Women





@DuhMahRuh
The time has come for social justice. Social media has connected activists from DC to activists in Baltimore, them to activists in California, and all of them to activists in Europe and beyond. The time is here and the time is now for social change. With this recent uprising in social issues of all sorts, two message that prevails across all campaigns are “Silence is injustice!” and “Silence encourages the tormentor, never the tormented” These messages, in many forms, have been prevalent and will remain prevalent in every campaign for justice. These messages are easy enough to understand: When unaffected persons are silent on an issue that is negatively affecting an oppressed group, it’s assumed that you agree with what seems like the majority of the negative opinions presented… so why would you add fuel to the fire if you have the same type of fuel that everyone else has been using? But, if you have tools to stop the spread of that fire, you should use them. Don’t just watch it burn because it’s not coming towards your house.

That paragraph alone could stand as the launching for several different discussions where silence helps the oppressor. Today, I want to talk about it in the terms of the silence of black men* that love and uphold black women* in the face of other black men* who continually degrade, attack, and slander black women*. I will drop the asterisk but it’s understood that I’m including all who identify as men and women, not just those who were born male and female.

I’ve seen several black men who claim to love black women, but when there are trending topics or blog posts that degrade black women… where are y’all at? I see black women coming in to their own rescue, and we do a DAMNED good job of it… but where are all those black women loving men then? There are a few who do, and I forever love and respect y’all for that, but for those that don’t… what are you doing? These boys and men slandering black girls and women… these are your sons, cousins, brothers, uncles, fathers, friends, homiez, niggas, bois… where are y’all at? Don’t tell me in a private DM that you love black women when you have a following of thousands and your last tweets include pictures of “bad, exotic (read: non-black) women” and #WhiteGirlWednesday posts.

Many men claim not to participate in this slander of black women, but you do nothing to actively protest it. They say “oh I can’t participate in this because that would disrespect my momma, my sister, my daughter, my baby momma, etc” but you’re not going to fight back FOR your momma, sister, daughter, and baby momma? Oh I won’t slander y’all, but I’ma let my niggas slander y’all and get away with it. No. Just stop. If I went up to you and said “Your mom is a rude, nagging, ghetto hoe who ain’t worth my time” you would get real defensive, right? So do that when you see that same sentence with black women or black girls.

We don’t need kings that won’t go to war for/with their queens.

Peace (of mind), love (for yourself), and (be sure to spread) happiness.



@TrueGodImmortal
I didn't want to write this counterpoint, but I felt it was necessary. These days, it feels as if the divide between black men and women is growing and I personally can't help but be saddened by it. However, to counter Demara's point just a bit, it is not just black men sitting by letting slander of black women go by freely. Black women also have a tendency to join in on the slander daily on men and each other, especially on social media. The slander has worked both ways, and both sides must be held accountable.

Daily, I see our beautiful black women speak of the slander they encounter from other black men, while in the same breath slandering brothers themselves. I love our people period, but if we are making a call for social justice and to stand up for something, that must work both ways. Black men and women are both seen as prey in America for different reasons. There has always been a divide and conquer strategy towards our people and I feel that at times like these, the strategy is working. I am a huge advocate for pro black movements, culture, and uplifting our women. I am of course not perfect, nor should I or anyone be expected to be that way. I don't make derogatory comments specifically directed at black women and in a previous post last year, I spoke on my love for black women in great detail. Have I made comments or used language that some women may find offensive? Absolutely. Am I sorry for some of those things I have said? Not really. Do those moments of annoyance or anger when those terms come out stop my overall love and appreciation for women? No. It doesn't. I think a lot of times, the black women slander comes from a place of hurt and anger, especially from the black men who do it. Just as the slander to black men from black women comes from that very same place. We are both hurting badly, it seems.



I find the "jokes" online about black women to be extremely corny and in the past, I've checked a few brothers on their comments, before feeling a bit lost afterwards. People say so much ridiculous shit online and most of it just comes from a place of ignorance. I use that same train of thought when seeing black women slander black men and they think nothing of it. That happens quite often, and I truthfully don't see too many sistas jumping up to defend us, just as there aren't many brothas stepping up to defend the sistas from slander either. To some, it is just jokes, regardless of how distasteful the joke is, they think it is just a joke. There are much deeper issues that lead to both black men and women carrying such disdain towards each other, and that syndrome is what still has us at odds today. The truth is that we need each other badly. We need to create dialogue to get to the true root of our issues collectively and individually. Lofty goals of course, but that is where it begins.

It has become alarmingly regular for women, feminists especially, to point the finger solely at men for the issues between us, and that's not fair at all. We both have work to do. There are plenty of amazing black women in the black man's corner, and there are plenty of black kings supporting our black queens as well. We tend to highlight the negativity so often that we overlook the positivity that may surround our people. There are glowing images of black love, black families, uplifting of our beloved black culture, and some strong solidarity amongst us.

The reality is, some of us, men and women, will remain ignorant to the fact that we need each other and to work together as one, as partners, and as a team. Those people we can only try but so much to reach them, before it is apparent that some will never fully understand. My call for social justice is unity. Solidarity. As black men and women, we should not allow ourselves to be the running joke. We should hold each other accountable for the ignorance, but also continue to spread love and positive vibes to each other.

The black woman goes through hell. The black man goes through hell. Everybody's individual experience and thoughts will be different, but in general, can we please love each other, work together, appreciate each other, stop slandering each other, and find a common ground? Can we? I believe so. Only time will tell.

Black people, unite. Love. We are powerful. We are kings and queens. Awaken. Together.

-DAR

No comments

Powered by Blogger.